My neighborhood has a problem with bullying

It makes sense that a real estate mobbing, an organized crime whose goal is forced eviction and the “turning over” of a property for speculation, would occur here in this lakeside neighborhood of northeast Seattle that has been the focus of a small group of residential developers and real estate speculators since the early days of recovery from the “Great Recession.” It makes sense that this brutal crime would be perpetrated by small-time house flippers who thrive on neighborhood brouhahas and economic distress, or fly-by-night developers thrilled at the prospect of playing cops-and-robbers as they bully the vulnerable off property they want. Symbolically, real estate mobbing might be seen as a revenge crime of embattled home owners against the renters they scapegoat for diminished property values or a “feel-good” crime of owners against renters who fared better than they did in the recession, kind of like the crimes of the Nazi era against the Jews they blamed for any downturn.

No matter how you cut it, real estate mobbing makes sense in my anti-renter neighborhood. My neighborhood has a problem with bullying.

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National crime databases

These must exist already, but if they allow only searches for specific types of crimes, say, breaking and entering, or searches by name, or if they are not available to all levels of local investigative authorities, national crime databases should have expanded searches available to all investigators nationwide.

For example, I’ve tried to search the Internet for crimes involving parametric speakers. Investigators should be able to search national databases to bring up all crimes involving the use of parametric speakers by device or “weapon,” all crimes involving “bot” hoaxes by methods, and not just whatever crimes have been committed by certain persons by name. And this information should be shared between the FBI and local authorities. If the FBI cannot be involved in a case without local police investigation, the local police should at least have all information that has been collected and amassed in a database about certain types of crime. Victims should not languish because they are the targets of crimes that will not be investigated by the local police.

Advanced searches should, of course, allow filtering by place, suspects, motives such as property, and more.

Perhaps this all exists already.

Sound check, one two

The day before yesterday a friend took me to get a few full sheets of plywood. I wanted to try blocking my bedroom windows from the the outside with a softer wood instead of just relying on absorbing the harassment from the inside with layers of sound board. This is one of the countermeasures I’ve used to survive as a victim of “real estate mobbing” in a northeast neighborhood of Seattle, Washington that is the focus of heavy speculation. Amnesty International describes the crime of real estate mobbing as “harassment of tenants to force them off property” (Spain: Submission to the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 48th Session, May 2012, http://www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cescr/docs/ngos/AI_Spain_CESCR48.pdf), but this is a crime that affects residents and land owners alike, interfering with basic rights to live in peace and to enter into contracts.

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An offer you can’t refuse

Our lives begin to end

the day we become silent

about things that matter.

— Martin Luther King

The “mobbers”—tenant clearers who have been trying to “clear” me from my legal rental home by round-the-clock criminal eavesdropping and harassment for at least two years—woke me at 5:00 am this morning, a day that honors Martin Luther King. Waves of verbal abuse streamed into the house not only from the north and south sides where the mobbers live and work, but seemingly from the house across the way.

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On “Future Crimes” by Marc Goodman

Last night I dropped by Seattle’s Town Hall to see Marc Goodman’s talk on his newly released compendium of computer crimes, Future Crimes: Everything is Connected, Everyone is Vulnerable and What We Can Do About It (Random House/Doubleday, 2015). I didn’t expect, but hoped that there might be discussion of the use of computer crime to advance real estate ventures. Nor is it included in Future Crimes, so far as I can see, but I picked up a copy of the book last night and started to thumb through it at home.

Future Crimes is a survey of the vast criminal cyber-terrain that lies ahead of us as “smart” devices take over our world. Goodman’s belief is that this is the terrain onto which we’ve already crossed, the future that is already here.

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What am I itching now?

I woke to the sound of the cat meowing this morning. After opening the door for her, I went back to bed. The mobbers had heard me get up and picked up the babbling.

Get out.

I got you out of Microsoft.

I killed your cat.

I’ve let go questions about how they operate, always focusing on the importance of not allowing myself to be wearied with trying to figure something out that’s designed to frustrate and tire me to the point where I’ll give up and leave my home. So I don’t know for sure how much they actually see, and how much of it might just be shotgun or parabolic microphones and a lot of close listening or close listening in combination with knowledge of my habits acquired before the mobbing began. But this morning I felt like poking at them for a change.

“What am I itching now?” I asked.

There was dead silence.

“Where’s my finger now?”

Nothing.

The babble resumed, the murmurs soft and nonresponsive.

Civil forfeiture for mobbing

I just got off a phone call with a recruiter. The entire time I was on the call, one of the mobbers—a familiar female voice that I associate with the mobbing house to the south—harangued me on the cell phone. Get out! Move on! If anyone is coming in or out of the mobbing houses, they are doing it when at least I can’t see them. But the walls are alive with harassment this morning; I’ve stacked the windows so heavily with sound board as of late that they have difficulty getting in and generally create a commotion of some type in the wee hours, when I’m likely to be sleeping deeply, to disturb my rest. Over the months of the mobbing, I’ve been a light sleeper training myself to sleep heavily, to ignore the harassment, to move the pillow away from my ear, to sleep while the mobbing continues, to sleep while criminals watch and listen for my breath sounds, my swallow, signs that I can hear them, signs that I listen. But these last weeks without work, when they wake me I return to sleep, I sleep in and even have some dreams. This morning they’re hammering me as I sit at the computer, despite my having supplemented the sound board in the windows that can be accessed from north and south with some sheets from the bedroom. As I walk back and forth from kitchen to dining room making breakfast, they follow, shooting invective at me through some incompletely covered window pane. Get the fuck out. No matter how you scream and shout, we’re going to get you out! Now they take a break from voice harassment and project some mix of music and sound effects at the windows. As I once heard the owner of the house to the north say, Don’t give her any quiet.

Let’s talk about the penalties for mobbing as organized crime.

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To catch a mobber, catch a racketeer

Weeks back, I wrote a post called To catch a mobber. In this entry, I tried to give investigative authorities information about the methods of harassment that I believe have been used as I have come to understand them by experiencing them over time. Because my goal has always been to have crimes addressed in criminal court by criminal charges being brought against the real estate mobbers who’ve been attempting to “clear” me from my legal home for more than two years, I focused on stalking, cyber-stalking and monitoring. This became necessary because the crimes that are components of my mobbing are likely deliberately used because they are difficult to coherently report and difficult to prove.

I came to see the mobbers’ gambit as hiding criminal acts in civil cloth. All along, they’ve threatened to sue me for defamation, for “inference,” for valuation (of their properties), for any property I might ever inherit, to embarrass me in court and on and on, while criminally stalking, monitoring and harassing me. They’ve threatened to “cream” me in court, and the few times any part of this matter got to a courtroom, they defamed me and some other renters in a manner that was intended to force us out of the neighborhood. It became clear that civil court is the game they want to play.

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Let’s hope it’s a good one, without any fear

Happy New Year from the real estate mobbed at On being mobbed. We’re hoping, in the words of Yono Oko and John Lennon, that “it’s a good one, without any fear.”

So, this is Christmas
And what have you done?
Another year over
And a new one just begun

And so this is Christmas
I hope you have fun
The near and the dear one
The old and the young

A very merry Christmas
And a happy New Year
Lets hope it’s a good one
Without any fear

And so this is Christmas
For weak and for strong
For rich and the poor ones
The road is so long

And so happy Christmas
For black and for white
For yellow and red ones
Let’s stop all the fight

A very merry Christmas
And a happy New Year
Let’s hope it’s a good one
Without any fear

And so this is Christmas
And what have we done
Another year over
And a new one just begun

And so happy Christmas
We hope you have fun
The near and the dear one
The old and the young

A very merry Christmas
And a happy New Year
Let’s hope it’s a good one
Without any fear

War is over
If you want it
War is over
Now

 

— Yoko Ono and John Lennon